2004 OPC Award Winners

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1. THE HAL BOYLE AWARD
Best newspaper or wire service reporting from abroad
DEXTER FILKINS
The New York Times
"Street by Street in Fallujah"
Dexter Filkins spent eight days with Bravo Company in Fallujah, writing daily from a Marine unit that took 36 casualties, including six dead, in brutal street by street fighting. His unembellished strories provided graphic detail on the lives of Marines pinned down by sniper fire. At considerable risk to himself, he gave readers an immersion into combat that rivals the best of all war reporting.
CITATIONS: Matthew McAllester
Newsday
"On the Frontline in Fallujah"
C.J. Chivers and Steven Lee Myers
The New York Times
"The Siege in Beslan"

2. THE BOB CONSIDINE AWARD
Best newspaper or wire service interpretation of international affairs
PHILIP P. PAN
The Washington Post
"China : Confronting the System"
In an exhaustively reported series, Pan focuses on the inner workings of the largest authoritarian system in the world and highlights the conflict between individuals, the state and the Communist Party as China modernizes and reaches out to the world. His often searing portraits or ordinary Chinese – monks, students, cab drivers, AIDS activists and others – bring this classic conflict down to a very personal level that makes the series all the more readable. As well, the judges want to recognize the contribution of the researchers, Zhang Jing and Jing Ling.

CITATIONS: Russell Carollo, Mike Wagner, Mehul Srivastava, Ken McCall,
Jim DeBrosse, Larry Kaplow
Dayton Daily News
"The Toll of War"

Trudy Rubin
The Philadelphia Inquirer
"A Clear Eye on Iraq "

3. THE ROBERT CAPA GOLD MEDAL AWARD
Best published photographic reporting from abroad
requiring exceptional courage and enterprise

ASHLEY GILBERTSON
The New York Times
"The Battle for Fallujah"

Gilbertson was the most consistent visual recorder of the Iraq
conflict this year. Spending more continuous time there than almost any other
photographer, his images rise above the rest. Each picture stands alone aesthetically and, collectively, they portray the relentless tension and pressure the American troops were under in Fallujah. He sought out the best embeds and used those opportunities to make a memorable record of the American troops in action.


4. THE OLIVIER REBBOT AWARD
Best photographic reporting from abroad in magazines and books

PAOLO PELLEGRIN
Magnum for The New York Times Magazine
"How Did Darfur Happen?"

These pictures speak a totally different visual language than the usual
reportage. They are very sophisticated and impressionistic. They unify
the human plight of this story with the landscape in a dramatic way, creating
a vision unlike anyone else has shown in a much-covered story. The pictures
are unique and unforgettable.

CITATIONS: Mark Leong
Redux Pictures for Chronicle Books
" China Obscura"

Seamus Murphy
Newsweek
"Afghanistan Elections and Society"

5. THE JOHN FABER AWARD
Best photographic reporting from abroad in newspapers and wire services

ANDREA BRUCE WOODALL
The Washington Post
"The Cost of Liberty – Prostitution in Iraq "

It is extremely difficult to get access to such a sensitive subject as this Iraqi
woman forced into prostitution to support her family, yet Woodall was clearly able to gain her trust and document her story. The judges thought the subject was amazingly well-photographed and were struck not only by the intimacy but the artistry of the images. It shows a high level of visual sophistication and a great deal of respect for Woodall's subject.

6. FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY AWARD
Best feature photography published in any medium on an international theme

JAMES HILL
T he New York Times
"Beslan"

A compelling black and white approach to this huge news story shows with great effectiveness the terrible tragedy of the Beslan school bombing. The large format images drive home the stark reality of the massacre that took the lives of so many people, mostly innocent children. The minimalistic quality of Hill's pictures is truly haunting, so disquieting that one judge said, "You can hear the voices of the dead."

7. THE LOWELL THOMAS AWARD
Best radio news or interpretation of international affairs

MICHAEL GOLDFARB, ANNA BENSTED, GEORGE HICKS
WBUR – FM at Boston University
Inside Out Documentaries
"British Jihad"
The Lowell Thomas Award goes to WBUR-FM ( Boston University ) for excellent investigative radio work in exploring why Britain has become a recruiting center for global radical Islam, combined with a clear historic context for Britain 's Muslim community. The WBUR team gained access to radical Muslim preacher Omar Bakhri Mohammed and his followers, the father of a Briton detained at Guantanamo Bay and other members of the British Muslim community to explore why British citizens have been attracted to violent Islam.

CITATIONS: Joe Richman and Sue Johnson
Radio Diaries and NPR
"Mandela: An Audio History"

NPR Foreign Desk
National Public Radio
"The War in Iraq "

8. THE DAVID KAPLAN AWARD
Best TV spot news reporting from abroad

TED KOPPEL, LEROY SIEVERS, DAVID WRIGHT,
ALMIN KARAMEHMEDOVIC, RICK BENNET
ABC News – Nightline
"Spotlight on Darfur "

Nightline's reporting on the Sudan won for pure enterprise, for the heartbreaking images, for the strong analysis and good writing, and for the emotional appeal to viewers to shake off their apathy.

CITATION: Kimberly Dozier
CBS Evening News
" Iraq at War"

9. THE EDWARD R. MURROW AWARD
Best TV interpretation or documentary on international affairs

DAVID FANNING, SHARON TILLER, STEPHEN TALBOT, KEN DORNSTEIN
WGBH and KQED - Frontline/World
"Stories from a Small Planet"

The judges found Frontline's commitment to coverage of international stories evident in this series that features overlooked stories from all corners of the globe. Frontline World includes an account of a journalist's brutal beating death in Iran ; a shocking portrayal of kidnapped brides in Kyrgystan and the cynical exploitation of sex workers in India . Frontline World's powerful storytelling, enterprising reporting and disciplined editing combined to create a powerful example of foreign reporting at its best.

CITATIONS: Dan Rather, Mary Mapes, Dana Roberson Johnson, Mary Alfieri
CBS News – 60 Minutes Wednesday
"Prisoners of War: Abu Ghraib"

Peter Jennings, Tom Yellin, Sherry Jones
ABC News / PJ Productions
"Guantanamo"

10. CUNNINGHAM AWARD
Best magazine reporting from abroad

PATRICK GRAHAM
Harper's Magazine
"Beyond Fallujah: A Year with the Iraqi Resistance"
and
MICHAEL WARE
Time
"Reports from Iraq"

The judges thought that both these journalists brought courage and insight to their coverage of Iraq 's insurgency. Graham's compelling, village-level narrative illuminated the anger and passions of a small band of insurgents, and juxtaposed those views against the anxieties of American forces. Ware produced vivid, newsbreaking war correspondence that captured the challenges and forces arrayed against the U.S.

11. THE THOMAS NAST AWARD
Best cartoons on international affairs

KEVIN (KAL) KALLAUGHER
The Baltimore Sun

Kal knows how to take a complicated idea and make it simple and funny. The world economy, for example, appears as a man in a hospital bed on life support. After recovering, getting dressed and stepping onto the street, he is mowed down by a truck labeled "Oil Prices." In another, Putin ignores Bush and drives a steamroller that flattens Lady Liberty, or "Democracy in Russia ," to a pancake. With his cynicism, imagination and sharp drawing style Kal always hits his mark.

CITATIONS: Robert L. Ariail
The State ( Columbia , SC )

Stephen P. Breen
The San Diego Union-Tribune

12. THE MORTON FRANK AWARD
Best business reporting from abroad in magazines

PETE ENGARDIO, DEXTER ROBERTS, AARON BERNSTEIN
BusinessWeek
"The China Price"

The judges felt the reporting and interpretation in this piece was outstanding. It was wide-ranging, richly-detailed and crammed with telling anecdotes, particularly one that suggests American manufacturers – even when fine-tuning productivity in highly-mechanized plants, may not be able to compete with Chinese companies. An outstanding look at perhaps the world's most important business story this year.

CITATIONS: Katherine Boo
The New Yorker
"The Best Job in Town"

Matthew Swibel
Forbes
"Two Faces of Dubai"

13. THE MALCOLM FORBES AWARD
Best business reporting from abroad in newspapers or wire services

KEN SILVERSTEIN and T. CHRISTIAN MILLER
Los Angeles Times
"The Politics of Petroleum"

This comprehensive but compact series of three articles, with two major follow-ups, throws a clear light on the global intersection of oil and politics.
With exhaustive investigative reporting, thorough documentation and a clear, commanding narrative, Silverstein and Miller show how Western governments
and oil companies make a devil's bargain with those who control the world's new sources of oil – and the price paid in corruption, repression, poverty and misery for the people of supposedly oil-rich countries.

CITATION: Michael Oneal
The Chicago Tribune
"Outsourcing: Pain and Profit"

14 . THE CORNELIUS RYAN AWARD
Best nonfiction book on international affairs

STEVE COLL
The Penguin Press
"Ghost Wars"

In his remarkable book, "Ghost Wars," Steve Coll has brought submerged history to light and so made a critical contribution to understanding of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States . The devastation of that day seemed to come from nowhere. But it came from somewhere, and, thanks to Coll, we now know a lot more about its origins. Combining the resourcefulness of a journalist with the documentary research of an historian, Coll has, in effect, drawn the missing lines between the cold war and the war on terror. In tracing the vagaries and ultimate carelessness of U.S. policy in Afghanistan , Coll demonstrates how Osama bin Laden, was in significant respects, an American creation. The Mujahedin were first agents in the struggle against the Soviet Union , funded and encouraged by the CIA. Then the holy warriors turned on their creators. How and why and when exactly this happened were all unanswered questions before Coll's masterful, riveting chronicling of the foreign policy and intelligence debacle behind the 9/11 attacks.

15. THE MADELINE DANE ROSS AWARD
Best international reporting in the print medium showing a concern
for the human condition

MARK DANNER
The New York Review of Books
"Torture and Truth"

This outstanding entry addressed the issues of torture, international law and political responsibility. The original articles in the NYRB were in themselves a more than creditable example of investigative journalism, but backed as they are in this compilation by hundreds of pages of appendices supporting Danner's investigations, they depict the chilling story of how, by acts of commission and omission, the highest authorities in the United States mapped out the road to Abu Ghraib. Others have told the story and told it well, but Danner's work relentlessly exposed the culpability of those higher up the pecking order than the ordinary soldiers now in the dock.

CITATION: Molly Bingham
World Picture News, Vanity Fair
"Ordinary Warriors: The Iraqi Resistance "

16. THE CARL SPIELVOGEL AWARD
Best international reporting in the broadcast media showing a concern for the human condition

TIM WOLOCHATIUK, SIMCHA JACOBOVICI, RIC ESTHER BIENSTOCK, JENNIFER HYDE, SID BEDINGFIELD
Associated Producers for CNN and CBC
"CNN Presents: "Impact of Terror"

Reports of civilian attacks in the Middle East tend to pale with repetition, but this exemplary production found compelling personal stories at the heart of a suicide bombing in Israel . By focusing on the impact of the bombing on its victims and the rescue workers, it made concrete the grim conditions faced by those who live under the constant threat of terrorism.

CITATION: Lisa Zeff
ABC News Productions / Discovery Health
"Super Surgery: A Face Restored"

17. THE JOE and LAURIE DINE AWARD
Best international reporting in a print medium dealing with human rights

SEYMOUR M. HERSH
The New Yorker
"The Abu Ghraib Scandal"

Seymour Hersh uncovered the atrocities committed by U.S. soldiers at the Abu Ghraib prison camp in Iraq . His in-depth reporting unraveled a disturbing portrait of a breakdown in leadership at its worst. Hersh's series of articles not only took U.S. readers into the heart of the unthinkably tortuous conditions and practices at Abu Ghraib, his work helped motivate Washington to take action and to seek answers.

CITATION: Peter Landesman
The New York Times Magazine
"The Girls Next Door"

18. THE ERIC and AMY BURGER AWARD
Best international reporting in the broadcast media dealing with human rights

SVEN BERGMAN, JOACHIM DYFVERMARK, FREDRIK LAURIN
TV 4 Sweden
"Cold Facts: The Broken Promise"

A ground-breaking investigation into a previously hidden side of the war on terror. The TV4 investigative team researched and uncovered what are known as "extraordinary renditions": the secret shipping of asylum seekers or terrorism suspects to countries known for torture, with only a so-called "diplomatic assurance" that torture will not take place. The renditions to Egypt , with Sweden 's help, were accomplished through the CIA with a U.S.-government leased private jet and violated both Swedish and international law. The telecast was a bombshell in Sweden , which cherishes its reputation for upholding human rights. This program even changed policy. Following the broadcast, the Swedish government reversed course and said that the deportations were an embarassing mistake, and has called for an international investigation. In the year since TV4's revelations, this investigation has been the basis for a page one story in The Washington Post , a 60 Minutes show and dozens of American television, newspaper and magazine stories.

CITATION: Claudine LoMonaco and Mary Spicuzza
WGBH and KQED – Frontline / World
"A Death in the Desert"

19. THE WHITMAN BASSOW AWARD
Best reporting in any medium on international environmental issues

JANE PERLEZ
The New York Times
" Indonesia : Poisoning Buyot Bay "

From a strong group of submissions, the judges selected the work of Jane Perlez of The New York Times for exposing an environmental hell created in Indonesia by the world's largest gold mining company. In a series of articles, Perlez detailed evidence in the village of Buyot Bay of skin tumors, rashes, breathing difficulties, and headaches. She documented how harsh anti-environmental mining operations by Newmont Mining Corporation damaged fishing waters vital to natives. Until the Times series appeared the Indonesian government and the mining company had turned a deaf ear to the problem. This series forced the government to take legal action against Newmont.

CITATIONS: Daniel Glick, Fen Montaigne, Virginia Morell
National Geographic
"Signs from Earth"

Charles Wohlforth
North Point Press (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
"The Whale and the Supercomputer:
On the Northern Front of Climate Change"

20. THE ROBERT SPIERS BENJAMIN AWARD
Best reporting in any medium on Latin America


STEPHEN SEGALLER and ANGUS MACQUEEN
Thirteen/WNET, Channel 4, October Films Ltd .
Wide Angle: "An Honest Citizen"

Wide Angle's Honest Citizen stood out as a compelling, on-camera look at Maria Cristina Chirolla's struggles as the head of Colombia 's anti-money laundering and anti-drug team. Trying to bring law and order to a chaotic country at palpable personal risk, Chriolla's tale is told against the backdrop of the complex political situation. Unusual access and in-depth interviews with those on all sides of the issues including a top paramilitary leader, yielded dramatic footage of the deep and difficult connections between the U.S. and Colombia, a major recipient of U.S. aid.

CITATION: Scott Johnson with Mac Margolis
Newsweek
"Latin America Lags Behind"

21. THE ARTYOM BOROVIK AWARD
For outstanding reporting by a Russian journalist who displays courage, insight, balanced yet aggressive reporting, and independence of thought

DMITRI BELIAKOV
Bratishka , Special Forces Magazine; also Paris Match, Stern, The Sunday Times and International Herald Tribune
"Beslan"

Photojournalist Beliakov's sensitive eye captured the iconic images of Beslan's bewildered children. His lens caught the drama of a young girl, Aida, who was blown out of the gym during a bomb blast. He recorded the heartbreaking and illogical reality of her climbing back into the school. As well, however, he gained access to the media-shy Special Forces, the Spetnazy, and was able to capture pictures of the meticulous preparations and anxiety of the forces waiting to take control of the besieged school.

CITATION: Anastasia Korobkova
AstrTelsKom – Astrakhan TV
"Named a Terrorist"

This prize is named for Artyom Borovik, who was one of the earliest and boldest practitioners of glasnost (openness) in Mikhail Gorbachev's Soviet Union in the 1980s. Borovik, who won an Overseas Press Club award in 1991 for a 60 Minutes segment on a Soviet lab where the brains of Vladimir Lenin and other Soviet heroes were stored, was relentless in exposing the malfeasance, corruption, and dirty secrets of Russian officials. He was best known for his critical reporting from Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation. He died tragically in a plane crash in 1999 at the age of 39.

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